An Post Logo Source: yuonghei.ie

 An Post, the Irish postal administration, came into being in 1984 when, under the terms of the Postal & Telecommunications Services Act of 1983, the Post Office services of the Department of Posts and Telegraphs (P&T) were divided between An Post and Telecom Éireann, the telecommunications operator now called Eir. At its inception, during the early years of the Irish Free State, the Department of Posts and Telegraphs was the country’s largest department of state, and its employees (most of them postmen) constituted the largest sector of the civil service. Prior to this the Post Office in Ireland had been under the control of various Postmasters General, Irish and British, with the appointment of Evan Vaughan as postmaster in Dublin in 1638, generally accepted as the date for the establishment of a semi-formal postal system in Ireland. Oliver Cromwell’s postal Act of 1657 created a combined General Post Office for the three kingdoms of Ireland, Scotland and England and the position was affirmed by Charles II and his parliament by the Post Office Act of 1660.

Subsidiaries and joint ventures
An Post is involved in a number of joint venture operations and also has several subsidiaries. It has complete ownership of some of these, while it is part-owner of others, such as the An Post National Lottery Company and the Prize Bond Company Limited.

An Post National Lottery Company
An Post held the licence granted by the Minister for Finance to run the National Lottery through its subsidiary, An Post National Lottery Company until February 2014. All employees of An Post National Lottery Company were seconded from An Post, and as such were employed and paid by An Post rather than by the subsidiary. Since 2014, the National Lottery has been operated by Premier Lotteries Ireland, in which An Post is a stakeholder.

An Post Transaction Services
In 2003, An Post set up a new division to run its post office and transaction services business, entitled An Post Transaction Services or PostTS. It rebranded its post offices network as “Post Office” or “Oifig an Phoist” with a new, white-and-red logo, and introduced banking services in conjunction with Allied Irish Banks. It also introduced a service whereby newsagents could provide some Post Office services, entitled PostPoint.[citation needed]

In 2005 PostTS sold its foreign operations. The rebranding effort was partially reversed due to criticism, with the traditional An Post logo restored to Post Offices (the red-and-white symbol has been dropped from Post Offices, but remains in use for the company’s website BillPay.ie and for PostPoint). The original PostTS shop front design which featured predominantly English branding “PostOffice” with the location in English, has also been replaced with the Irish language “OifiganPhoist”, with the location in both Irish and English.[citation needed]

Between 2005 and 2006, An Post sold its interest in the Post TS UK and An Post Transaction Services businesses to Alphyra, for a reported €59.3m.

Geodirectory
Jointly established by An Post and Ordnance Survey Ireland, Geodirectory is a service that provides a database of buildings and addresses in the Republic of Ireland, as well as their geolocation details.It holds records for 2.2 million properties that receive post. GeoDirectory assigns each property its own individual “fingerprint” – a unique, verified address in a standardised format, together with a geocode which identifies every property in the country. Geodirectory also operates an award-winning mobile app called GeoFindIT.

Postbank
On 5 October 2006 An Post signed an agreement for the creation of a joint venture with Fortis to provide financial services through the Post Office network. This joint venture with BNP Paribas was created to offer financial products and services to the Irish market, including daily banking, savings products, insurance, mortgages, and credit cards. PostPoint and the company’s insurance business, One Direct, was to become part of the new company, with access to the Post Office network.In April 2007 a press launch was held for the new bank, which is to be known as Postbank (legally Postbank Ireland Limited, to distinguish from other similarly named operations such as Deutsche Postbank). By February 2010, the closure of the Postbank unit had been announced, and the operation was wound down by the end of December 2010.

Some counter business for AIB and Ulster Bank can be conducted at post offices and all counter business for Danske Bank must be as that bank does not operate its own branches.[citation needed]

Television licensing
Television licensing is administered by An Post. It is responsible for the collection of revenue, inspection, and prosecution in cases of non-payment of the licence on behalf of the state.

Most of services introductions on the webpage.

I think An Post don’t have any competitor able to compete with  it as  An Post is  monopoly in Ireland,  Irish people are the biggest phone internet users in the western world ,so i compare their mobile mobile website with some similar company’s mobile website.

source:independent.ie
An Post ,Royal Mail,USPS Mobile website

We can  see it clearly from the comparison diagram above, An Post mobile website is much more complicated then another two, mobile web design should focus  homepage on connecting users to the content they’re looking for, but user have to keep scrolling down the screen to find something on An Post mobile website .and they don’t even have search bar, Search is a fundamental mobile activity.  mobile devices are used mostly for finding stuff, And a search bar help users find what they want quickly and easily.

I think track post and get the price is most people use it for a post website, and it’s importance to setting in home page let people easy to find. An Post has track post item on home page but no price item , and people so difficult to find the price from an post’s website.

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